World-class training for the modern energy industry

The Fundamentals of Business for the Energy Transition: A European Perspective (E908)

Tutor(s)

Ben Klooss: Camberwell Energy

Overview

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of key business aspects in relation to the energy transition. Two case studies will be used to frame the course learnings.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a business background but want a basic introduction to the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and will be of interest to staff from a range of departments, including legal, graphics, administration and technical support, as well as the geoscience staff.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  • Understand the current global energy demand and how this will look in the future.
  • Recall the economic aspects of renewables.
  • Appreciate the mix and projected levels of current energy supply.
  • Describe the decarbonization targets for the EU and the overall scale of the energy transition that is required.

Course Content

This short course covers the key aspects of business for the energy transition and will give participants a fundamental understanding of the key aspects. Topics to be covered include:

  • Global energy demand and current and future projections by sector to 2050, with a focus on Europe – demand for electricity vs primary energy
  • Economic aspects of renewables (e.g. profitability, size of the application vs economics)
  • Global and European energy supply – current and projected levels of primary energy supply, including hydrocarbons, nuclear and renewables (e.g. geothermal, wind, hydrogen, solar and bioenergy). European estimates of domestically produced vs imported total primary energy
  • European climate policy objectives. Decarbonization targets for the EU and separately for the UK. The scale of the low-carbon energy transition that is required in Europe
  • Two case studies to illustrate opportunities, policy drivers and commercial factors: CCS in the Netherlands; and Hydrogen in the Netherlands. Each case study will discuss:
    • Specific market context to outline the scale of the opportunity
    • Policies, regulations and support instruments (i.e. carbon price, contract for difference, subsidies) directly affecting the particular business opportunity
    • Potential business models and commercial risks. This will include high-level descriptions of the factors determining business viability and profitability, as well as limiting factors

An Introduction to the Principles of Geology for the Modern Energy Industry (G067)

Tutor(s)

Richard Swarbrick: Manager, Swarbrick GeoPressure

Overview

A successful modern energy system will depend on sustainable and careful stewardship and use of geological resources and sub-surface geology. This fundamental course is intended for all interested in learning the basics of geology in relation to the modern energy industry. Irrespective of background knowledge or skills, the course will introduce you to the key geological terminology and concepts in order to gain a better understanding of subsurface geology.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 1-day* course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Two 4-hour online sessions presented over 2 days, comprising lectures and exercises. A digital manual will be distributed to participants before the course.

*A day in the field can be included where logistics allow, to observe a variety of rock types and for participants to gain a better understanding of key geological themes.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is intended to introduce the principal themes of geology for the modern energy industry. No previous knowledge is assumed and hence the course should also appeal to those without a science/geoscience background.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand the future of energy provision and the role that geoscience plays.
  2. Recall the fundamental principles of geology including different rock types, geological time and stratigraphy.
  3. Understand how a sedimentary basin is formed and the different types of clastic depositional systems.
  4. Understand the basics of a geoscience subsurface toolkit including seismic imaging and other types of subsurface geological data.
  5. Appreciate the key elements of petroleum systems analysis with a focus on reservoirs.
  6. Recall the geological principles to be considered for carbon capture and storage (CCS) as well as hydrogen projects.
  7. Appreciate how a well is drilled into the subsurface and the types of wells that can be drilled.

Course Content

Session 1 Fundamental Principles of Geology

  • Structure of the Earth
  • Earth history
  • Basin formation and fill
  • Rock types
  • Sedimentary rocks
  • Sedimentary depositional systems
  • Principles of stratigraphy
  • Geological structures
  • Subsurface geoscience toolkit – seismic and other geological data

Session 2: Geology in the Modern Energy Industry

  • Petroleum systems analysis
  • Petroleum reservoir rocks
  • Principles of drilling into the subsurface
  • Reservoir geology for CCS and hydrogen projects

Fundamentals of Geophysics (G028)

Tutor(s)

John Randolph: Consultant Geophysicist

Overview

This class provides an overview of seismic technologies commonly used in exploration and production with a focus on conventional reservoirs. Participants will review case histories and discover how seismic imaging might add value to their projects.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: 1 day; a mix of lectures (85%) and a hands-on exercise (15%). The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercise.

Virtual version: Two 4-hour interactive online sessions presented over 2 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Fundamental. Intended for engineers, supervisors and managers who desire a understanding of how various seismic technologies might be leveraged along with geological and engineering data to solve exploration and production problems.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand how commonly used geophysical tools can add value to E&P projects.
  2. Discuss how seismic data responds to changes in rock properties.
  3. Explain the principle steps involved in seismic imaging and interpretation.
  4. Communicate effectively with team members regarding geophysical project objectives.

Course Content

  1. Why invest in seismic data?
  2. Reservoir response to seismic waves; what we should expect to see.
  3. Seismic acquisition & processing; how is it done, and at what cost?
  4. Seismic amplitude changes; what are they telling us about reservoirs?
  5. Seismic interpretation; what is involved?
  6. Examples of exploration, production, geothermal, and CO2 storage projects.

The Fundamentals of Hydrogen Energy (E903)

Tutor(s)

Kevin Taylor: Professor in Energy Geoscience, University of Manchester

Overview

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the fundamental aspects of the current hydrogen energy landscape. This will include a range of topics, including what hydrogen is and why it can potentially be a significant fuel and energy carrier, the different methods in which it can be produced, its potential role in decarbonization of energy and heat, how it can be stored in the subsurface, and its place overall within the energy transition.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a scientific background but want a basic introduction to the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and will be of interest to staff from a range of departments, including legal, graphics, administration and technical support.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand what hydrogen is and why it can be used as a fuel and energy carrier.
  2. Describe how hydrogen can be produced and the resulting different types and terminology.
  3. Appreciate the role hydrogen can play in decarbonizing energy and heat, and the competing demands in the hydrogen energy landscape.
  4. Appreciate the different storage options for hydrogen, particularly in the subsurface.
  5. Recall details of the developing hydrogen supply chains, including infrastructure and distribution networks.

Course Content

This short course covers the key aspects of the emerging hydrogen economy and will give participants a fundamental understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the energy transition. Topics to be covered include:

  • Producing hydrogen
  • Storing and moving hydrogen
  • What hydrogen can be used for
  • Developing hydrogen supply chains
  • How hydrogen can be stored underground

The Fundamentals of Carbon Capture and Storage (E902)

Tutor(s)

Richard Worden: Professor in the Department of Earth Ocean and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK

Overview

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of what carbon capture and storage is, how it works and its role in decarbonization and the energy transition.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a scientific background but want a basic introduction into the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and be of interest to staff from a range of departments, including legal, graphics, administration and technical support.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand what carbon capture and storage is.
  2. Appreciate why carbon capture and storage is needed to reduce emissions.
  3. Outline how carbon capture and storage works.
  4. Discuss carbon capture and storage project risks and uncertainties.

Course Content

This short course covers the key aspects of carbon capture and storage and will give participants a fundamental understanding of the role of this technology in the energy transition, including how it is possible to store carbon dioxide in the subsurface and what has been done so far on the global scale. Topics to be covered include:

  • What is carbon capture and storage?
  • What is underground that allows carbon dioxide to be stored?
  • How many carbon capture and storage projects are needed at the current rate of emission to cut greenhouse gas emissions?
  • How much carbon dioxide can be stored underground?
  • What happens to the carbon dioxide once it is placed underground?

The Fundamentals of Wind and Solar Power (E907)

Tutor(s)

Brian Matthews: Independent Consultant, Founder and Managing Director of TerraUrsa 

Overview

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of wind and solar power technology, how it works and its role in decarbonization and the energy transition.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a scientific background but want a basic introduction into the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and be of interest to staff from a range of departments including legal, graphics, administration and technical support.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand why there is a need to transition to renewable energy.
  2. Recall the challenges of a Net Zero energy transition.
  3. Appreciate how wind and solar power technology works and what the management of an asset looks like through its life.
  4. Describe what the business opportunities are for using, developing and investing in renewable energy.
  5. Have an awareness of what the policy and government strategies are that support a Net Zero transition.

Course Content

This short course covers the key aspects of wind and solar power and will give participants a fundamental understanding of the role of this technology in the energy transition. Topics to be covered include:

  • What renewable energy is, with a specific focus on wind (on- and off-shore) and solar
  • How wind and solar produce electricity, and where / when they work best
  • What the challenges are within the renewable energy sector and some of the solutions, including the use of energy storage
  • Examples of wind (on- and off-shore) and solar projects
  • Why companies are decarbonizing by investing in and using renewable energy (policy, strategy, reputation)
  • What the global energy trends are and what the future could look like

The Fundamentals of Geothermal Energy (E904)

Tutor(s)

Mark Ireland, Lecturer in Energy Geoscience, Newcastle University

Overview

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of what geothermal energy is and how it can be used in our modern world.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a scientific background but want a basic introduction to the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and will be of interest to staff from a range of departments, including legal, graphics, administration and technical support.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand what geothermal energy is.
  2. Outline the applications and use of geothermal energy.
  3. Describe the key characteristics of geothermal resources.
  4. Discuss geothermal project risks and uncertainties.

Course Content

Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in rocks and fluids within the Earth’s crust that can be utilized at the surface as a source of energy for heating and generating electricity. This short course covers the key aspects of geothermal energy and will give participants a fundamental understanding of its role in the energy transition. Topics to be covered include:

  • The role of geothermal projects in decarbonization
  • The need to decarbonize heating and cooling
  • The basic scientific principles of geothermal resources
  • What geothermal energy can be used for
  • How a geothermal project works and what technology is involved
  • Uncertainties and challenges in developing geothermal energy