World-class training for the modern energy industry

Geothermal Sedimentary Systems: Exploration, Development and Production Principles (E574)

Tutor(s)

Mark Ireland: Senior Lecturer in Energy Geoscience, Newcastle University

Overview

This course covers all aspects of various sedimentary geothermal systems, from exploration through to production. It is intended as an introduction to the entire lifecycle of sedimentary geothermal resources, covering aspects of geoscience and engineering.

Duration and Logistics

Four 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 4 days. A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Fundamental. The course is intended for all career stage industry professionals and early career researchers with a geoscience or geo-engineering background, including those with a familiarity in oil and gas production.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand the basic principles of heat generation within the upper crust.
  2. Describe the key characteristics of sedimentary geothermal resources and reservoirs.
  3. Examine the geothermal play concept.
  4. Establish exploration methods using oil and gas data to assess geothermal resources in sedimentary basins.
  5. Illustrate the development and production options for these geothermal resources.
  6. Appreciate the principle geological hazards, in relation to geothermal projects, including induced seismicity.
  7. Appreciate the range of environmental impacts associated with geothermal developments.
  8. Appreciate project risks and uncertainties in developing geothermal resources.

Course Content

This course will focus on the lifecycle of sedimentary geothermal resources and the associated project workflows.

Session 1: Principles of sedimentary geothermal resources

  • Sedimentary basins: formation and types
  • Heat flow in the upper crust
  • Geothermal play system types

Session 2: Geothermal resource characterization

  • Geological characterization of resources
  • Geothermal sedimentary reservoirs characterization
  • Demand side importance

Session 3: Exploration to production

  • Geothermal exploration and production
  • Geohazards and environmental considerations
  • Case studies

Session 4: Impacts, risks and uncertainties

  • Uncertainties and challenges in developing geothermal resources
  • Integration of geothermal resources into energy systems planning

Induced Seismicity in Geothermal Fields (E568)

Tutor(s)

Emmanuel Gaucher: Senior Research Geophysicist, Geothermal Energy and Reservoir Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Overview

This course covers fundamental and practical aspects associated with induced seismicity in deep geothermal fields. A refresher of the most relevant rock mechanics and seismological aspects will be followed by a review of the main observations and modelling approaches. Monitoring concepts for risk mitigation or reservoir imaging will also be presented.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 2-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Four 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 4 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual will be distributed to participants before the course. This course will also contain practical exercises to reinforce key learnings. (In the virtual sessions, individual simplified questions will be asked; for a classroom version of the course, attendees will work in small groups.)

Level and Audience

Intermediate. The course is intended for geoscientists wishing to learn what seismicity in geothermal fields is, how it is induced and how we could mitigate it while using it for imaging purposes. Geoscientists from the oil and gas industry sensitive to hydrofrac operations can also join to understand differences.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Assess induced seismicity characteristics to gain critical information, such as location, magnitude and fault plane solutions.
  2. Evaluate the pros and cons of the methods used to determine seismic information.
  3. Design the main features of a seismic monitoring network for specific monitoring objectives within a given geological context.
  4. Propose appropriate sensor deployment type(s), data management procedures and processing sequence.
  5. Identify the main drivers for induced seismicity in a geothermal field.
  6. Predict likely operations that could induce seismicity according to subsurface properties and structures, and identify the most critical ones.
  7. Propose appropriate mitigation approaches taking account of the subsurface characteristics and operations proposed.

Course Content

The course will cover the following topics and provide answers to the following questions:

  1. Rock mechanics – why does the rock break? Why does a fault move?
    • The role of the stress field
    • Rock and fault failure modes and failure criteria
    • Slip and dilation tendency of faults. Is a fault likely to be reactivated?
    • Exercise: Calculate slip-tendency on a fault.
  2. Passive seismic
    • Seismogram content – what information is hidden in a seismogram? Source effect, geometrical spreading and receiver response
    • Seismic source description – how can we use the seismogram to determine the characteristics of the seismic event, i.e. its location, origin time, energy and focal mechanism? What is the difference between magnitude and intensity?
    • Exercise: Manually locate an earthquake.
  3. Induced seismicity in deep geothermal fields – observations
    • In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and in hydrothermal systems
    • Common features
    • Correlation of seismicity with field operations
  4. Induced seismicity in deep geothermal fields – modelling approaches
    • Statistical-based modelling
    • Physics-based modelling
    • Hybrid modelling
  5. Induced seismicity monitoring
    • A few existing regulations
    • ‘Traffic light system’ and ‘Adaptive traffic light system’ – towards a reservoir management system
    • Seismic monitoring design – what influences the waveform observed at a seismic station? Network sensitivity, magnitude of completeness
    • Exercise: Propose a seismic network and mitigation procedure for the monitoring of a virtual geothermal field.

The Fundamentals of Geothermal Energy (E904)

Tutor(s)

Mark Ireland, Lecturer in Energy Geoscience, Newcastle University

Overview

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of what geothermal energy is and how it can be used in our modern world.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A half-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: One 3-hour interactive online session (a morning in North America and an afternoon in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials will be distributed to participants before the course.

Level and Audience

Awareness. The course is aimed at non-technical staff and those who do not have a scientific background but want a basic introduction to the topic. The subject matter will be covered from very basic principles and will be of interest to staff from a range of departments, including legal, graphics, administration and technical support.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand what geothermal energy is.
  2. Outline the applications and use of geothermal energy.
  3. Describe the key characteristics of geothermal resources.
  4. Discuss geothermal project risks and uncertainties.

Course Content

Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in rocks and fluids within the Earth’s crust that can be utilized at the surface as a source of energy for heating and generating electricity. This short course covers the key aspects of geothermal energy and will give participants a fundamental understanding of its role in the energy transition. Topics to be covered include:

  • The role of geothermal projects in decarbonization
  • The need to decarbonize heating and cooling
  • The basic scientific principles of geothermal resources
  • What geothermal energy can be used for
  • How a geothermal project works and what technology is involved
  • Uncertainties and challenges in developing geothermal energy

Geothermal Drilling and Completion (E558)

Tutor(s)

Catalin Teodoriu: Professor, University of Oklahoma, USA

Overview

This course covers fundamental aspects of geothermal drilling and completion engineering, highlighting the differences between conventional oil and gas and geothermal activities. It encompasses the main geothermal drilling characteristics, focusing on deep geothermal well construction and completion concepts. The course also covers conventional and unconventional geothermal technologies, addressing the need of drilling and completion challenges. The last part of the course will concentrate on well integrity aspects, ranging from existing oil and gas wells to built-for-purpose geothermal wells.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 3-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Five 4-hour interactive online sessions presented over 5 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual will be distributed to participants before the course. Some reading is to be completed by participants off-line.

Level and Audience

Advanced. The course is intended for geoscientists wishing to learn the engineering aspects of geothermal project implementation, and oil and gas professionals transitioning towards sustainable energy opportunities.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Identify key factors in streamlining geothermal project decision making processes.
  2. Understand different management styles and their impacts on geothermal planning and execution.
  3. Identify the uncertainties and risks associated with drilling geothermal wells.
  4. Assess the impact of different well construction and completion concepts on the life of the well integrity.
  5. Discuss and analyze case studies involving different geothermal well construction solutions.

Course Content

This course will focus on geothermal well construction and completion covering the following topics:

Session 1:

  • Introduction and course presentation
  • Special aspects of geothermal drilling (conventional vs geothermal)
  • Special drilling techniques for geothermal drilling (including geosteering for closed loop application)
  • Mud design and well control for geothermal applications (effect of high temp on mud selection and well control needs)

Session 2:

  • Geothermal well cementing (high volume in high temperature regimes, cement loss, cement properties, long-term cement behavior)
  • Alternative materials for well construction (to improve well thermal insulation or heat transfer)
  • Overall heat transfer coefficient in wells and its implications in well design

Session 3:

  • Well completions for geothermal applications (what is different and why it is needed)
  • Tubing selection – composite, vacuum-insulated tubing for BHE, tubing-less solutions
  • Formation isolation fluids to allow closed loop without casing (cementless well construction)

Session 4:

  • Introduction to well integrity (current oil and gas standards, define leak, life of the well integrity)
  • Well integrity of geothermal wells (what is different, why matters, well integrity for oil and gas conversions, doublet well integrity aspects)
  • Casing design and material selection – composite, coated / relined, alternative solutions

Session 5:

  • Identification and solution of drilling problems associated with geothermal wells
  • Selected case studies
  • Discussions and take away points

Geothermal Energy: Resources, Projects and Business Aspects (E529)

Tutor(s)

David Townsend: CEO, TownRock Energy

Overview

This course explores the key themes of geothermal energy from the fundamentals of what a geothermal resource is and what it can offer, through to project examples and the business case. The course will explore a variety of geothermal resource types and current EU-based project examples, in addition to environmental considerations, legislation and future innovations and emerging technologies.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 2-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Four 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 4 days. A paper by the course presenter will be distributed to participants before the course, and materials for an interactive cashflow modelling exercise will be distributed during the course.

Level and Audience

Fundamental. The course is aimed at those individuals looking to transition to geothermal projects and/or who are new to the geothermal industry

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand the basics of geothermal resources and their use and applications.
  2. Recall the fundamental characteristics of geothermal resources and reservoirs.
  3. Appreciate the European potential for geothermal projects and case studies representative of the current state of active projects, as well as some case studies of unsuccessful projects.
  4. Describe the fundamentals of a geothermal project business case, including identifying the relevant stakeholders, the project development timeline and the risks and mitigations.
  5. Assess the financial framework of a geothermal project and how to create a business model and de-risk these projects.
  6. Assess the potential environmental impacts of geothermal developments.
  7. Understand how emerging technologies can be included as part of a geothermal project and how these could rewrite the way geothermal business models are developed in the future.

Course Content

The course will illustrate geothermal project development from the point of identified value through ta business case and model. The tutor will explore current projects in development and give attendees a sound understanding of their business context.
Introduction to geothermal energy

  • What is geothermal energy?
  • Where are geothermal energy systems utilized?
  • High, medium and low enthalpy
    • installed capacity worldwide
  • Classification of geothermal systems
    • volcanic, convective fracture, sedimentary aquifers and HDR, pressured systems (O&G)
  • Uses of geothermal energy
    • power, industrial heat, greenhouses, district heating, leisure
  • What makes geothermal energy a sustainable renewable energy?
    • geothermal system sustainability assessment
    • environmental sustainability
    • carbon footprint<

European potential for geothermal and current low enthalpy projects

  • History of geothermal in Europe (timeline)
  • Geological structure and heat flow
  • Heat vs electricity
  • Different resources and EU project examples (shallow aquifers, mine water, deep geothermal)
  • Re-purposing oil and gas infrastructure
  • EU and select nation-state governmental policy (decarbonizing heat)

Fundamentals of a geothermal project business case

  • Stakeholders
  • Project development timeline to reduce risk and raise funding through stage-gate process
  • Being demand led: start with the customers’ needs!
  • Project risks
  • Assessing revenue streams
  • Assessing capex
  • Assessing opex
  • Joining the dots to make a project investable

Financing of geothermal projects

  • Sliding scale of the capex of projects (deep geothermal at the top, shallow at the bottom)
  • Reasons for this difference in capex and opex
  • How to finance a project
    • grant funded
    • government / council backed
    • private
    • loans / equity / pensions
  • Developing a cashflow forecast
  • After-care – O&M and optimization

Mine water energy

  • History of mining
  • Mine locations in Europe
  • General overview of mine water energy
  • Creating a business case for a mine water heating project
  • Active TownRock project case studies

Hot sedimentary aquifers (HAS)

  • What is an HSA?
  • European sedimentary basins
  • Cross-sections through basins, showing depths and temperatures
  • Creating a business case for a hot sedimentary aquifer heating project
  • TownRock case studies with explanation of cost benefit of ‘going deeper’ to avoid the need for a heat pump
  • Capex vs opex discussion

Deep geothermal

  • Location of granites
  • Fractures
  • Explanation on the increased thermal gradient
  • Creating a business case (major heat customer)
  • Is there a place for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)?
  • Geohazards: induced seismicity

Thermal storage

  • What is it?
  • General technology overview and application of TES
  • TES options (boreholes, aquifers, water tanks, salts)
  • BodyHeat case study and creating a business case

Innovation and emerging technologies

  • Technological innovations
    • hybrid systems
    • integrated systems
    • cascading systems
  • Emerging technologies
    • EGS systems
    • closed-loop systems – Eavor
    • repurposing oil and gas wells / infrastructure
  • Future energy market
    • development risks
    • lithium and other metals extraction
  • Future innovation (community, legislation, industry)
  • How do these de-risk / benefit the financing of geothermal projects

Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (E519)

Tutor(s)

Matthew Jackson: Chair in Geological Fluid Dynamics, Imperial College London

Overview

This course covers all subsurface aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) and includes a brief overview of surface engineering and infrastructure requirements. The course includes an introduction to ATES, aquifer characterization for ATES, including geological and petrophysical considerations, ATES performance prediction, including modelling and simulation, and engineering considerations, including ATES system management and optimization.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 3-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Five 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 5 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual exercise will be distributed to participants before the course. Some reading and exercises are to be completed by participants off-line.

Level and Audience

Intermediate to advanced. The course is relevant to geoscientists and engineers and is intended for recent graduates and professionals with experience of, or a background in, a related subsurface geoscience or engineering area.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Describe the underlying principles of ATES and the context of its deployment worldwide.
  2. Evaluate the properties of an aquifer for ATES deployment.
  3. Perform aquifer characterization for ATES.
  4. Appreciate the engineering considerations for efficient and sustainable ATES operation.
  5. Understand modelling and simulation of ATES.
  6. Optimize single and multiple ATES projects.
  7. Evaluate surface infrastructure requirements and operation.
  8. Review the regulatory considerations for deployment and operation.

Course Content

This course will focus on the subsurface geoscience and engineering considerations for ATES.

Session 1: Introduction to ATES – definitions and international context

  • Basic requirements for ATES
  • Types of ATES systems and global projects
  • Basic principles of operation
  • Characterizing ATES efficiency and operation
  • Case study
  • Exercise

 

Session 2: Aquifer characterization for ATES

  • Aquifer characterization for ATES
  • Mass and heat transfer
  • Scales of characterization
  • Porosity
  • Concept of representative pore volume
  • Permeability
  • Thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity
  • Exercise

Session 3: Modelling and simulation of ATES

  • Mass and heat transfer in aquifers
  • Rock properties and data acquisition
  • Modelling the reservoir
  • Geological modelling of ATES
  • Numerical simulation

Session 4: Engineering ATES deployment and operation

  • Pumping tests
  • Thermal response tests
  • System design
  • Sustainable operation
  • Impacts on groundwater
  • Exercise

Session 5: Surface facilities, regulatory issues and economic considerations

  • Positive attributes and barriers to ATES
  • Strategies to overcome barriers
  • Surface facilities
  • Economic considerations
  • Decarbonization value
  • Exercise

 

 

An Introduction to GeoEnergy Transition Projects: Field Seminar in Cornwall, UK (E518)

Tutor(s)

Alistair Donohew: Director, Kovia Consulting Ltd

Richard Swarbrick: Manager, Swarbrick GeoPressure

Overview

Cornwall is exceptionally rich in geological resource and is emerging as an important location for developing new technologies in the UK transition to a Net Zero economy. This course provides a snapshot of several operational and demonstration GeoEnergy Transition projects, as well as visits to associated traditional Cornish outcrops and rejuvenated mining operations. Examples of specific projects to be investigated include a deep geothermal energy site and a critical mineral (lithium) extraction site. Participants will also investigate sites previously considered for deep storage of nuclear waste and locations associated with low enthalpy energy from mine waters. Participants will gain a practical and technical understanding of several geoenergy projects and should be able to apply this learning to other geological locations worldwide.

Duration and Logistics

A 5-day field course with a combination of field activities and exercises, plus classroom sessions.

Level and Audience

Fundamental. This course is intended for technical professionals working in related sectors. Participants will be shown the context and challenges for developing low carbon technologies for energy, as well as the parallel examination of surface renewable energy technologies.

Exertion Level

This class requires an EASY exertion level. Field locations are mainly accessed by a short walk of less than 1 mile (1.6km) along coastal paths or on sandy / cobbled beaches. Other field stops include working industrial sites (e.g. quarries).

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Describe and explain the geoenergy resource potential of Cornwall.
  2. Characterize ideal locations and explain technical factors that affect different resource potentials.
  3. Describe how wider factors can affect feasibility of certain geoenergy resources, including the environmental, social and economic (political and commercial) factors.
  4. Evaluate strategic choices for local and regional policy makers, as well as landowners and investors.

Course Content

The course will link field observations with real examples of GeoEnergy Transition projects, placing these within a sub-regional context and wider policy framework. Topics to be covered include:

  • Orogenesis and tectonic setting
  • Granite emplacement and formation of batholiths
  • Geochemical fractionation trends: biotite-muscovite and biotite-tourmaline crystallization series, and major and trace element distributions
  • Natural fracture systems within the granite and fluid flow
  • Geothermal gradients within granite and Devonian slates
  • Novel drilling and injection / circulation testing of wells
  • Factors affecting location of geothermal sites
  • Mineralization and mineral deposits associated with granites
  • Enriched mineral groundwaters and mine waters
  • Sustainable mining: innovation in co-production and in-situ extraction
  • Surface renewable technologies and Cornwall’s low carbon strategy

Itinerary (tbc based on availability of sites)

Day 0 – Arrive in Cornwall

At accommodation

LEARNING / THEME: Key context, objectives and procedural information

  • Establish prior learning – an interactive exercise relating to topics to be encountered in the field seminar
  • Introduce key context and learning objectives
  • Course safety briefing

Day 1 – West Cornwall (‘down west’)

Field locations: Cape Cornwall / Porth Ledden, Rinsey Cove and Penzance

LEARNING / THEME: Orientation and developing geological context

  • Stratigraphy, orogeny and regional tectonics
  • Granites and mineralization
  • Socio-cultural context – Penzance / Mounts Bay culture, primary industry, tourism and lido (attempted HDR heating)
  • Mine experience at Geevor

Plenary – Issues and opportunities for extraction and energy projects? Reflect on locations, types of mineralization and extraction.

Day 2 – St Agnes (NW Cornwall)

Field locations: Camborne, Cligga Head and Cotty’s Point at Perranporth

LEARNING / THEME: Classic Cornish mineralization

  • South Crofty tin mine – tour by Cornish Metals of facilities and core store
  • Cligga Head greisen veins outcrop
  • Cotty’s Point cross course mineralization outcrop

Plenary – Summarize which minerals are critical for our future and why.

Day 3 – Carnmenellis and environs

Field locations: United Downs, Wheal Jane, Carnmenellis granite outcrops and Rosemanowes Quarry

LEARNING / THEME: Geothermal and offshore energy (plus onshore surface renewables)

  • Major joint sets and cross course mapping at Carnmenellis – geothermal reservoirs
  • United Downs Geothermal and Mineral Groundwaters project visit
  • Wheal Jane mine water project visit (low temperature geothermal potential and mineral brines)

Plenary – Make a case for a location in Cornwall for deep geological disposal of nuclear waste.

Day 4 – St Austell granite

Field locations: projects and sites across St Austell

LEARNING / THEME: Critical minerals (esp. lithium)

  • China clay project visit – hosted by Imerys
  • Hard rock lithium / tungsten at St Austell
  • Extraction and sustainable mining project visit
  • Surface renewables at Roche and A30
  • Eden geothermal project visit – drill site visit and subsurface explanation

Plenary – Evaluate Cornwall’s GeoEnergy Transition and compare with another area you know.

Day 5 – Eden and ESAM at Carluddon Technology Park

At conference facilities

LEARNING / THEME: Application of learning to real problem

  • Critical appraisal of UK and Cornwall’s Low Carbon Strategy
  • Workshop future challenges – with officers from Cornwall Council and/or Imerys

Plenary – Consolidation, application of learning and relevance to work projects.

Geothermal Resources Assessment: Quantification and Classification (E515)

Tutor(s)

Gioia Falcone: Rankine Chair of Energy and Engineering, University of Glasgow

Overview

This course covers the principles of geothermal resources assessment, encompassing quantification and classification best practices. Leveraging lessons learnt from the oil and gas sector, the course highlights the need for transparency in the approach. It presents the challenges and opportunities of comparing the assessment of different energy resources within a mixed energy portfolio, towards the transition to a sustainable Net zero future.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 2-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Four 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 4 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual will be distributed to participants before the course. Some reading is to be completed by participants off-line.

Level and Audience

Advanced. The course is intended for energy policy makers, energy stakeholders in charge of investment and funding decisions, and oil and gas professionals transitioning towards sustainable energy opportunities.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand the need for energy resource assessment.
  2. Describe different resource estimation methods.
  3. Interpret resource assessments according to different frameworks.
  4. Identify the uncertainties and risks associated with a geothermal resource assessment.
  5. Assess the impact of project definition on resource quantification and classification.
  6. Discuss the technical, economic, social and environmental nexus of energy resources assessment.

Course Content

This course will focus on geothermal resources assessment and classification methods, covering the following topics:

  • The need for resource assessment
  • Lessons learnt from the oil and gas sector
  • Geothermal resource estimation methods
    • Probabilistic vs deterministic
    • Heat flow
    • Areal analogy (power density)
    • Stored heat method
    • Decline curve analysis
    • Numerical reservoir modelling
    • Monte Carlo simulation
  • Past and present approaches to geothermal resources classification
  • Project-based assessment
  • Examples of current assessment framework for the energy transition

Geothermal Technologies and Well Design (E514)

Tutor(s)

Gioia Falcone: Rankine Chair of Energy and Engineering, University of Glasgow

Overview

This course covers fundamental aspects of geothermal engineering, linking the subsurface to the point of sale (or point of use). It encompasses the main geothermal energy uses, focusing on deep geothermal resources exploitation methods, where wells are required. The course also covers conventional and unconventional geothermal technologies, including closed-loop solutions and hybrid energy development opportunities.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 2-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Four 3.5-hour interactive online sessions presented over 4 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual will be distributed to participants before the course. Some reading is to be completed by participants off-line.

Level and Audience

Advanced. The course is intended for geoscientists wishing to learn the engineering aspects of geothermal project implementation, and oil and gas professionals transitioning towards sustainable energy opportunities.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Understand the different way in which a given geothermal energy resource can be exploited, and the associated uses.
  2. Describe how open-loop and closed-loop engineering solutions work.
  3. Interpret operational aspects of typical geothermal well designs.
  4. Identify the uncertainties and risks of different exploitation methods, vis-à-vis resource sustainability over project lifetime.
  5. Assess the impact of different well performance and well integrity aspects on ultimate recovery.
  6. Discuss and analyse case studies involving different geothermal technologies.

Course Content

This course will focus on geothermal resources exploitation methods, where wells are required, covering the following topics:

  • Conventional geothermal resources exploitation methods
    • Shallow and deep geothermal resources
    • Conduction vs convection dominated systems
    • Different geothermal energy uses
  • Unconventional geothermal resources exploitation methods
    • Closed-loop vs open-loop
    • ‘New generation’ EGS systems
  • Examples of deep geothermal well designs
    • Well completions
    • Well performance
    • Well integrity
  • Examples of hybrid energy technologies
    • Hydrocarbon wells
    • Mine water
    • CO2-plume geothermal systems

Geology and Fractures for High Enthalpy Geothermal (E507)

Tutor(s)

David McNamara: Lecturer in Earth Science, University of Liverpool

Overview

This course covers aspects of geoscience relevant to high enthalpy geothermal systems. It will introduce the geothermal system play concept and geothermal field classification. Teaching materials and exercises will provide skill development in how to characterize important aspects of the geology of these geothermal systems from structural networks, permeability, geomechanics and more.

Duration and Logistics

Classroom version: A 3-day course comprising a mix of lectures, case studies and exercises. The manual will be provided in digital format and participants will be required to bring a laptop or tablet computer to follow the lectures and exercises.

Virtual version: Five 3.5-hour interactive online sessions, comprising three lecture sessions and two practical sessions (one on working with borehole image logs in geothermal wells and interpreting these datasets, and the other on stress field characterization from well data). The sessions are presented over 5 days (mornings in North America and afternoons in Europe). A digital manual and exercise materials (including well logs) will be distributed before the course. Some reading and exercises are to be completed by participants off-line.

Level and Audience

Advanced. The course is intended for all career stage industry professionals and early career researchers with a geoscience or geo-engineering background, including those with a familiarity in oil and gas production.

Objectives

You will learn to:

  1. Recognize the geological components of a geothermal system play.
  2. Understand the range of data required to characterize a fractured geothermal reservoir.
  3. Characterize fracture and stress data from a geothermal reservoir that can be used in geomechanical models and flow models.
  4. Determine potential geological controls on well permeability.

Course Content

This course will focus on establishing the geological components of a high enthalpy geothermal system, specifically the interplay between geological structure, stress and fluid flow.

Session 1: High enthalpy geothermal systems

  • Geothermal system plays
  • Fractured reservoirs
  • Geothermal geomechanics

Session 2: Characterizing geothermal systems

  • Building blocks of a geothermal resource model
  • Geothermal borehole imaging
  • Structural analysis

Session 3: Working with borehole images in geothermal wells

Session 4: Quantifying geomechanical inputs from well data and rock properties

Session 5: Case studies of geothermal geomechanics and wrap up